“International Astronomy”: Wednesday, June 28, the first day of Eid Al-Adha

The Director of the International Astronomy Center, Engineer Muhammad Shawkat Odeh, stated that most of the countries of the Islamic world will investigate the crescent of the month of Dhu al-Hijjah on Sunday, June 18, 2023 AD, corresponding to Dhu al-Qi`dah 29 1444 AH, and on that day, seeing the crescent is hardly possible using the telescope from the center and west of the Islamic world. Accordingly, it is expected that Monday, June 19, will be the first day of the month of Dhul-Hijjah in many countries, and that Tuesday, June 27, will be the stand of Arafah, and Wednesday, June 28, the first day of Eid Al-Adha.
Odeh said: “With regard to the position of the crescent on Sunday, June 18, in some Arab and Islamic cities, the superficial calculations for the crescent at sunset are as follows: In Jakarta, the moon sets after 07 minutes of sunset, and its age is 6.5 hours. In Abu Dhabi, the moon sets 29 minutes after sunset, and its age is 12.4 hours. Vision in Jakarta and Abu Dhabi is not possible even using a telescope. In Riyadh, the moon sets 31 minutes after sunset, and it is 13 hours old. In Amman and Jerusalem, the moon sets 37 minutes after sunset, and its age is 13.8 hours. In Cairo, the moon sets 36 minutes after sunset, and it is 14 hours old. In Rabat, the moon sets 44 minutes after sunset, and its age is 16.2 hours. Visibility in Riyadh, Amman, Jerusalem, Cairo and Rabat is possible using a telescope only, although it is difficult in the east and the middle, and requires very clear skies to enable vision.
And he added: “To know the meanings of these numbers, it should be noted that the minimum duration of the crescent that could be seen with the naked eye was 29 minutes, while the minimum age of the crescent that could be seen with the naked eye was 15 hours and 33 minutes. The sighting of the crescent is related to other factors, such as its angular distance from the sun and its distance from the horizon at the time of its observation.
He pointed out that many Islamic countries depend on their local vision to determine the beginning of the month of Dhu al-Hijjah and Eid al-Adha, and do not follow any other country, and among these countries: Malaysia, Indonesia, Brunei, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Iran, the Sultanate of Oman, the Kingdom of Morocco, Mauritania, Turkey, and most non-Arab Islamic countries in Africa. . And given that seeing the crescent on Sunday, June 18, is not possible by any means from the east of the Islamic world, and it is not possible on that day with the naked eye from the Islamic world, it is expected that some of the previous countries will announce that Tuesday, June 20 is the first day of the month of Dhu al-Hijjah, and that it will be Thursday. June 29 is the first day of Eid al-Adha in these countries.
He called on the public to learn about the results of observing the crescent, by visiting the website of the Islamic Project for Observing the Crescent of the International Astronomy Center on the Internet at the address (http://www.AstronomyCenter.net).

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